Friday Follow-Up: Online Knitting Highlights for the Week of August 25th

As the weather cools, sweater season is drawing near. Lots of new sweater patterns popped up this week!

  • I have recently discovered Mel Ski’s Hawaiian inspired patterns and I love this sweater: Mauna Kea.
  • Thea Colman released Dirty Martini, a cute aran weight cardigan.
  • Amy Miller’s latest sweater is a striped v-neck pullover: Signature Stripes. I love Amy’s sweater patterns!
  • A Fine Tuesday is an asymmetrical cardigan designed by yellowcosmo.
  • Hanna Maciejewska’s Wisteria Lane is a cute fingering weight pullover with pretty lace details.
  • Here is a sport weight cardigan pattern by Laura Aylor: Robie Street.
  • And Tincanknits has a new ebook ready for pre-ordering: Road Trip. There are lots of great fall patterns including several sweaters.

Now, which of these great sweater patterns will I add to my ‘I Wish I Had Time to Knit This’ list? Decisions, decisions….

Michelle

What is Friday Follow-Up? My Friday Follow-Up is a weekly blog feature. Every Friday, I follow-up the online knitting events of the week with my own take on things.

Friday Follow-Up: Online Knitting Highlights for the Week of August 18th

I’m always noticing what other Canadian designers are doing. Here are some newly released Canadian designs this week:

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Yay Canada! Have a great weekend…. Michelle

What is Friday Follow-Up? My Friday Follow-Up is a weekly blog feature. Every Friday, I follow-up the online knitting events of the week with my own take on things.

Jogless Stripes and Underarm Gaps – Working on my ‘I Wish I Had Time to Knit This’ List

It’s been a while since I posted a progress update on my ‘I Wish I Had Time To Knit This’ list. Here’s my list:

And a new addition to the list….

I recently finished my Grace sweater. Yarn is Madelinetosh Sock in Antique Lace.

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Instead of the Gradient Pullover by Amy Miller, I decided to knit her Sperry sweater. The yarn I am using is Cascade Superwash Sport in grey with white stripes. Here’s a progress pic:

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What I really want to share here is the two techniques that have proven invaluable. First of all, both sweaters are top-down patterns and both require the picking up of stitches for working the sleeves. The stitches are picked up in the underarm area, easy enough, but I struggled with the gaps left on either side of the picked up stitches. This is a similar problem to picking up stitches at the heel on socks. Of course, we can pick up an extra stitch at each gap and then decrease it. I found this Youtube video that shows a particularly easy and invisible way of doing it: www.youtube.com/watch?v=LIUeMvFlkok. It worked beautifully for me!

The Sperry sweater has helped me to perfect the jogless stripe technique described here at the TECHknitting blog. The sweater is worked in the round and the white stripes are only two rows each. Hiding the jog is tricky. This finally ‘clicked’ for me and I have been working flawless traveling jogless stripes ever since!

Michelle

Friday Follow-Up: Online Knitting Highlights for the Week of August 11th

I’m back from holidays and back at work this week. Here’s what I’ve been watching in the online knitting world….

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  • Fellow Canadian designer, Andrea Rangel, released her Fietser Mitts and Cowl patterns. They are worked in the beautiful Anzula Cloud. I might just have to make these. They are simple and classic, just my style!
  • One of my favourite designers, Amy Miller, released a new shawl pattern: Elizabeth.
  • Malabrigo released a new MFPP collection, Berlin – Wrapped in Red, with patterns by 6 different designers as well as a new Quickie pattern in Rios:  Tiltawhirl Cowl by Stephannie Tallent.

Have a great weekend! Michelle

What is Friday Follow-Up? My Friday Follow-Up is a weekly blog feature. Every Friday, I follow-up the online knitting events of the week with my own take on things.

Friday Follow-Up: Online Knitting Highlights for the Week of July 28th

It’s been a busy week in the online knitting world – fall is in the air!

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Have a great weekend! Michelle

What is Friday Follow-Up? My Friday Follow-Up is a weekly blog feature. Every Friday, I follow-up the online knitting events of the week with my own take on things.

Spotting the kfb Stitch 101

If you, like me, get distracted while knitting and frequently lose your place, you might appreciate this little hint for working the Totally Triangular Scarf. If you can’t remember if it’s time to work the kfb increase or not, (do I work it on this right side row? or did I just work it on the previous right side row? darn, I can’t remember…) learn how to spot it in your knitting. That way, you will know exactly which row you worked it on and which row needs it next.

The kfb increase leaves a little bar in your knitting each time it is worked. It’s not very visible, particularly in garter stitch (which is why I like to use it in garter stitch), but it can be seen if you look for it. Here’s a photo of my Totally Triangular Scarf in progress. The arrows point to the kfb bars. The kfb increase is worked every four rows.

kfbstitchThe above photo shows the right side of the knitting, ready to work a right side row. We are repeating Rows 3 – 6, but did I just work Row 3 or 5? I can’t remember. As you can see by the arrow, I worked Row 6 with the kfb two rows ago, so that means I must have just worked Row 3 and Row 4 is next. Whew. But look at this next photo. Where am I now?

kfbstitch2I can see that I worked Row 6 with the kfb four rows ago, so Row 6 is up next.

Similarly, when you are working the decreases, you can spot the k2tog stitches by looking closely for two stitches knitted together.

I hope these photos help you to identify where your kfbs are in your knitting. It sure helps me to keep track of where I am in the Totally Triangular pattern!

Michelle

 

 

Friday Follow-Up: Online Knitting Highlights for the Week of July 21st

Here’s what I’ve been watching this week in the online knitting world:

  • Two new surprises were added to Knitty.com’s First Fall 2014 issue: Thisbe – socks by Nancy Green, and Change of Heart – a cowl by Justyna Lorkowska.
  • Sweaters remained popular on Ravelry’s Hot Right Now list with Amy Miller’s Victoria, Thea Colman’s Amaro, and the Purl Bee’s Bamboo Shell.
  • And Knitpicks is having a site-wide sale: 10% off!

Have a great weekend! Michelle

What is Friday Follow-Up? My Friday Follow-Up is a weekly blog feature. Every Friday, I follow-up the online knitting events of the week with my own take on things.

Free Pattern: Totally Triangular Scarf

If you enjoyed the Truly Triangular Scarf, then try your hand at this one. With one small change to the pattern, you get a longer, narrower scarf. In this pattern, the same number of stitches are cast on and bound off. The same amount of yarn is used. Remember to weigh your yarn before you begin and periodically while working the increase section. You will want to start decreasing when half the yarn is used up. This pattern is also great for just one skein of yarn, or however much you have on hand.

Totally Triangular Scarf Knotted

The Totally Triangular Scarf is also a garter stitch scarf and it uses the same increase and decrease stitches – kfb (knit into the front and then the back of the stitch) and k2tog (knit 2 stitches together). The difference is that the increase and then decrease stitches are worked on every second right side row, causing the scarf to increase and then decrease more gradually, creating a longer, leaner triangle. If you like a scarf with long ends to wrap around your shoulders, this is the pattern for you.

Totally Triangular Scarf full view

I have used the same slipped stitch edge on this scarf. To make this edge, the first stitch of every row is slipped knitwise (as if to knit) while holding the yarn at the back of the work (wyib). The last stitch of every row is purled. It helps to work these first and last stitches tightly to maintain a smooth edge.

Totally Triangular Scarf closeup

When a pattern lacks embellishment or complexity, the yarn is what can make it truly beautiful. I have used  Malabrigo Rastita here again. It is a slightly felted merino wool. It is a DK weight yarn. Any sport to worsted weight yarn could work well with this pattern. Gauge isn’t too important.

Materials

  • 1 skein of Malabrigo Rastita (100% merino wool; 310 yd [283 m]/3.53 oz [100 g]). Shown here in Sabiduria.
  • US size 8 [5.0 mm] needles, or size needed to obtain gauge.
  • 1 stitch marker.
  • Blocking materials.

Gauge

  • 17 sts and 26 rows = 4 inches [10 cm] in garter stitch, after blocking.

Stitches Used

  • k – knit
  • p – purl
  • sl – slip the stitch from left to right needle as if to knit, with yarn in back
  • kfb – knit into the front and then the back of the stitch (increase)
  • k2tog – knit 2 stitches together (decrease)

Instructions

Weigh yarn. Half of the yarn will be used for the increase section and the remaining half for the decrease section. Weigh yarn periodically as you work to see how much is left. All slipped sts are slipped knitwise (kwise) with yarn in back (wyib).

Cast on 3 sts.
Setup Row 1 (WS): Sl1, kfb, p1.
Setup Row 2 (RS): Sl1, k1, place marker, kfb, p1.

Increase Section:
Row 3 (WS): Sl1, k to marker, slip marker, k1, p1.
Row 4 (RS): Sl1, k1, slip marker, knit to last st, p1.
Row 5: Sl1, k to marker, slip marker, k1, p1.
Row 6: Sl1, k1, slip marker, kfb, knit to last st, p1.
Repeat Rows 3 – 6 until half of yarn has been used. Weigh yarn periodically to check.

Decrease Section:
Row 7 (WS): Sl1, k to marker, slip marker, k1, p1.
Row 8 (RS): Sl1, k1, slip marker, knit to last st, p1.
Row 9: Sl1, k to marker, slip marker, k1, p1.
Row 10: Sl1, k1, slip marker, k2tog, knit to last st, p1.
Repeat Rows 7 – 10 until 4 sts remain.

Next Row (WS): Sl1, k1, remove marker, k1, p1.
Next Row (RS): Sl1, k2tog, p1.

Finishing

Bind off the remaining 3 sts. Weave in all ends. Wash and block to desired measurements.

This photo shows how the Truly Triangular Scarf (the red scarf) and the Totally Triangular Scarf (purple scarf) compare. One increases and decreases quickly and the other more gradually. Which shape do you prefer?

scarves compared

 

The Truly Triangular Scarf pattern can be found here: Free Pattern: Truly Triangular Scarf.

A helpful tutorial that shows how to spot the kfb stitch in your knitting can be found here: Spotting the kfb Stitch 101.

Free Pattern: Truly Triangular Scarf

The sideways shawl, or scarf is a popular knitting pattern. It starts with only a handful of cast-on stitches, increases to the middle, and decreases back down to the same number of stitches that were cast on. So, if you don’t enjoy casting on or binding off loads of stitches or have a hard time binding off loosely enough to match the cast-on, then the sideways scarf is a great pattern.

Truly Triangular Scarf
Another benefit to this type of pattern is that you can use however much yarn you want or have available. Weigh your yarn before starting on a small kitchen scale. Then weigh the remaining yarn periodically while you work the increase section and when half the yarn is left, begin decreasing. This is the perfect way to use up some stash yarn! Plus, it’s a great pattern for one skein of yarn.

The Truly Triangular Scarf is a simple garter stitch sideways triangular scarf. The increase stitch used is kfb (knit into the front and back of the stitch) which is a great choice for garter stitch as it is nearly invisible. The decrease stitch used is the k2tog (knit 2 stitches together), also nearly invisible in garter stitch. The increase and then decrease stitches are worked on every right side row, causing the scarf to increase and then decrease quite sharply, creating a true triangle shape.

Truly Triangular Scarf full view

This pattern has a slipped stitch edge on every side of the triangle. I love using this edge stitch, especially on a garter stitch shawl or scarf. It makes a lovely neat and clean edge. To make this edge, the first stitch of every row is slipped knitwise (as if to knit) while holding the yarn at the back of the work (wyib). The last stitch of every row is purled. It helps to work these first and last stitches tightly to maintain a smooth edge.

Truly Triangular Scarf closeup

When a pattern lacks embellishment or complexity, the yarn is what can make it truly beautiful. The yarn used here is Malabrigo Rastita. It is a slightly felted merino wool. It is a DK weight yarn. Any sport to worsted weight yarn could work well with this pattern. Gauge isn’t too important.

Materials

  • 1 skein of Malabrigo Rastita (100% merino wool; 310 yd [283 m]/3.53 oz [100 g]). Shown here in Cereza.
  • US size 8 [5.0 mm] needles, or size needed to obtain gauge.
  • 1 stitch marker.
  • Blocking materials.

Gauge

  • 17 sts and 26 rows = 4 inches [10 cm] in garter stitch, after blocking.

Stitches Used

  • k – knit
  • p – purl
  • sl – slip the stitch from left to right needle as if to knit, with yarn in back
  • kfb – knit into the front and then the back of the stitch (increase)
  • k2tog – knit 2 stitches together (decrease)

Instructions

Weigh yarn. Half of the yarn will be used for the increase section and the remaining half for the decrease section. Weigh yarn periodically as you work to see how much is left. All slipped sts are slipped knitwise (kwise) with yarn in back (wyib).

Cast on 3 sts.
Setup Row 1 (WS): Sl1, kfb, p1.
Setup Row 2 (RS): Sl1, k1, place marker, kfb, p1.

Increase Section:
Row 3 (WS): Sl1, k to marker, slip marker, k1, p1.
Row 4 (RS): Sl1, k1, slip marker, kfb, knit to last st, p1.
Repeat Rows 3 and 4 until half of yarn has been used. Weigh yarn periodically to check.

Decrease Section:
Row 5 (WS): Sl1, k to marker, slip marker, k1, p1.
Row 6 (RS): Sl1, k1, slip marker, k2tog, knit to last st, p1.
Repeat Rows 5 and 6 until 4 sts remain.

Next Row (WS): Sl1, k1, remove marker, k1, p1.
Next Row (RS): Sl1, k2tog, p1.

Finishing

Bind off the remaining 3 sts. Weave in all ends. Wash and block to desired measurements.

The Truly Triangular Scarf increases and then decreases sharply, creating a true triangle shape. What happens when the increasing and decreasing happen more gradually? Try the Totally Triangular Scarf!

scarves compared

 

Friday Follow-Up: Online Knitting Highlights for the Week of July 14th

Here’s what I’ve been watching this week in the online knitting world:

Have a great weekend! Michelle

What is Friday Follow-Up? My Friday Follow-Up is a weekly blog feature. Every Friday, I follow-up the online knitting events of the week with my own take on things.