Free Knitting Patterns: Jagged Triangular Scarf

My free Truly Triangular and Totally Triangular Scarf knitting patterns have been hugely popular. These triangular scarves are easy to work, can be worn as either a scarf or a shawl, and garter stitch scarves or shawls are always popular in the knitting world. One question I have been asked several times, though, is whether or not these patterns can be worked with a sock or fingering weight yarn. The answer is yes! The pattern instructions can be followed as is but using a slightly larger than recommended needle. I suggest using US 6 needles. Easy, right? Let’s even take it one step farther…. This is the Jagged Triangular Scarf and it is based on the Totally Triangular Scarf pattern but with the addition of a cute little jagged edge. Read on for the free garter stitch Jagged Triangular Scarf pattern!Jagged Triangular Scarf

The Jagged Triangular Scarf is an easy sideways garter stitch scarf and the increase stitch used in the body of the scarf is the kfb stitch (knit into the front and back of the stitch). It’s my favourite increase stitch to use with garter stitch because it is nearly invisible. (In fact, it can be hard to spot in your knitting. Check out my tutorial to learn how to find it! Spotting the kfb Stitch 101). The decrease stitch used is the k2tog (knit 2 stitches together), also nearly invisible in garter stitch.

The jagged edge is worked at the same time as the body and is created by increasing one stitch (using kfb again) on every right side row four times and then, on the eighth row, binding off four stitches at the beginning of the row. The eight row repeat is worked over and over again, at the same time as the body is worked, to create the jagged edge.

Jagged Triangular Scarf Edging

Like the Totally Triangular Scarf, the increase and decrease stitches are worked on every second right side row, so that the scarf increases and then decreases gradually, creating a long lean triangle. Eight stitches are cast on for this one and it is worked sideways, increasing to the middle point and then decreasing back down to eight stitches. The long ends can be wrapped, tied, or worn however you prefer!

You can use however much yarn you want or have available. Weigh the yarn before starting on a small kitchen scale. Then weigh the remaining yarn periodically while you work the increase section and when half the yarn is left, begin decreasing. It’s a great pattern for those single skeins of sock or fingering yarn that we all have sitting in our stash!

Jagged Triangular Scarf CloseupLike the Truly and Totally Triangular Scarves, this pattern also uses a slipped stitch to create a lovely neat and clean edge to the scarf. To make this edge, the first stitch of every row is slipped knitwise (as if to knit) while holding the yarn at the back of the work (wyib). The last stitch of every row is purled (except for the eighth row where four stitches are bound off at the beginning of the row).

The yarn used here is Malabrigo Sock and the sample is shown in the colour Ochre. Any sock or fingering weight yarn can be used with this pattern. Variegated and tonal yarns would be especially beautiful in a garter stitch pattern like this. It is important to block the scarf before wearing. Blocking evens out the stitches, gives the fabric its beautiful drape, softens the yarn, and achieves the finished size. (To learn more about blocking, take a look at this tutorial: Shawlette Blocking 101).

Jagged Triangular Scarf Instructions

Materials

  • 1 skein of Malabrigo Sock (100% superwash merino wool; 440 yd [402 m]/3.53 oz [100 g]). Shown here in Ochre. Or, 1 skein of any sock or fingering weight yarn.
  • US size 6 [4.0 mm] needles, or size needed to obtain gauge.
  • 1 stitch marker.
  • Blocking materials.

Gauge

  • 19 sts and 26 rows = 4 inches [10 cm] in garter stitch, after blocking.

Stitches Used

  • k – knit
  • p – purl
  • sl – slip the stitch from left to right needle as if to knit, with yarn in back
  • kfb – knit into the front and then the back of the stitch (increase)
  • k2tog – knit 2 stitches together (decrease)

Instructions

Weigh yarn. Half of the yarn will be used for the increase section and the remaining half for the decrease section. Weigh yarn periodically as you work to see how much is left. All slipped sts are slipped knitwise (kwise) with yarn in back (wyib).

Cast on 8 sts.
Setup Row (WS): Sl1, k4, place marker, k2, p1.

Increase Section:
Row 1 (RS): Sl1, k to last st before marker, kfb, slip marker, k2, kfb, k1, p1.
Row 2 (WS): Sl1, k5, slip marker, knit to last st, p1.
Row 3: Sl1, k to marker, slip marker, k2, kfb, k2, p1.
Row 4: Sl1, k6, slip marker, knit to last st, p1.
Row 5: Sl1, k to last st before marker, kfb, slip marker, k2, kfb, k3, p1.
Row 6: Sl1, k7, slip marker, knit to last st, p1.
Row 7: Sl1, k to marker, slip marker, k2, kfb, k4, p1.
Row 8: Bind off 4 sts, knit to last st, p1.
Repeat Rows 1 – 8 until half of yarn has been used. Weigh yarn periodically to check.

Decrease Section:
Row 1 (RS): Sl1, k to last 2 sts before marker, k2tog, slip marker, k2, kfb, k1, p1.
Row 2 (WS): Sl1, k5, slip marker, knit to last st, p1.
Row 3: Sl1, k to marker, slip marker, k2, kfb, k2, p1.
Row 4: Sl1, k6, slip marker, knit to last st, p1.
Row 5: Sl1, k to last 2 sts before marker, k2tog, slip marker, k2, kfb, k3, p1.
Row 6: Sl1, k7, slip marker, knit to last st, p1.
Row 7: Sl1, k to marker, slip marker, k2, kfb, k4, p1.
Row 8: Bind off 4 sts, knit to last st, p1.
Repeat Rows 1 – 8 until 8 sts remain.

Final Row: Sl1, k2, remove marker, k4, p1.

Finishing

Bind off the remaining 8 sts. Weave in all ends. Wash and block to desired measurements.

Charts

Increase Chart

Decrease Chart

 

Note: With my 100 gram skein of Malabrigo Sock, I worked the Increase Section 34 times and had a total of 76 stitches on the needle at the middle point. I also worked the Decrease Section 34 times.

Jagged Triangular Scarf Blocking



Pattern by Michelle Krause.

Copyright 2016 by Leah Michelle Designs. Pattern, photos, and charts may not be sold for profit or distributed or reproduced without permission.

10 thoughts on “Free Knitting Patterns: Jagged Triangular Scarf

  1. Dear Leah,

    I love this simple pattern and realize that once underway the repetitive nature of the design will completely erase my issue, but here it is: When selecting a font for your pattern, size matters. Once I printed it, the fine character and small size of the font made it pretty difficult to read. My eyesight isn’t too bad, but without doing some manipulation, I am going to be squinting a lot or need to be near my computer to follow the instructions. Please file this away for future consideration. I have a few gorgeous skeins of hand dyed yarns just crying out for simple designs with a twist and this pattern is perfect!

    Best regards,
    Marne

    • Marne, not sure how you are printing this, but I just cut and paste to a Word doc. then you can make the font as large as you want. Maybe this will help. Very nice pattern.

      • Julia,

        You are so right about the solution. I don’t mean to put the entire burden on the designer when the solution is right at hand. I felt like a jerk saying anything at all. I just wanted to do a ‘Control P’ an be done with it! Started this shawl last night using some Dream in Color Jilly that will be fantastic.

        Marne

      • No worries! I appreciate you bringing this up. The solution will be helpful for others too. Enjoy the pattern. Your shawl will be gorgeous in that that yarn!

  2. Hello
    I love that scarf – the pattern.
    I have little problem as I have shorter skein, it is 115 g/4 oz, lenght 384 m/420 yards it is 80% merino wool and 20% nylon and I know that yarn is Light Fingering or 3 ply. And I want to do it that way but how to shorten the long ends because I don’t want to end up with too lean triangle. I’m not very good yet in that so I don’t knw how I can make it to have this with this beautiful edge and a little bit like Truly Triangular Scarf wilder in middle part and bit shorter long ends?

    Is there a chance to knit it to get result like that?

    Thank you for any advice!

    • Hi! The Jagged Triangular Scarf pattern is based on the Truly Triangular Scarf pattern so you should get a similar shape. You can get the shape you want when blocking too. Block it into more of a triangle shape. I hope this is helpful!

      Michelle

      • First Happy New Year Michelle and
        Thank you I appreciate your answer but I think I wasn’t precise enough what I need.

        I want Truly Triangular scarf with the edges from Jagged Triangular Scarf so with short ends because those from Jagged are to long for me. I mean I want my scarf to look like on first photo of your red Truly Triangular Scarf with short ends but also I want the beautiful edge from Jagged Scarf.

        Please if you can tell me how to get this effect
        thanks again
        Joanna

      • Sorry, my mistake. The Jagged Triangular Scarf pattern is based on the Totally Triangular Scarf, not the Truly Triangular Scarf. (I really shouldn’t have named them so similarly. I mix them up all the time!) The shape of each scarf is determined by how often the increase and decrease stitches are worked. In the Totally and Jagged Scarves, they are worked every second right-side row. In the Truly Scarf they are worked every right-side row. So… to make your Jagged Scarf more triangular, you should work the increase every right-side row as follows. The increases are bolded so you can see what I mean.

        Increase Section:
        Row 1 (RS): Sl1, k to last st before marker, kfb, slip marker, k2, kfb, k1, p1.
        Row 2 (WS): Sl1, k5, slip marker, knit to last st, p1.
        Row 3: Sl1, k to last stitch before marker, kfb, slip marker, k2, kfb, k2, p1.
        Row 4: Sl1, k6, slip marker, knit to last st, p1.
        Row 5: Sl1, k to last st before marker, kfb, slip marker, k2, kfb, k3, p1.
        Row 6: Sl1, k7, slip marker, knit to last st, p1.
        Row 7: Sl1, k to last stitch before marker, kfb, slip marker, k2, kfb, k4, p1.
        Row 8: Bind off 4 sts, knit to last st, p1.
        Repeat Rows 1 – 8 until half of yarn has been used. Weigh yarn periodically to check.

        And do the same with the decreases.

        Decrease Section:
        Row 1 (RS): Sl1, k to last 2 sts before marker, k2tog, slip marker, k2, kfb, k1, p1.
        Row 2 (WS): Sl1, k5, slip marker, knit to last st, p1.
        Row 3: Sl1, k to to last 2 sts before marker, k2tog, slip marker, k2, kfb, k2, p1.
        Row 4: Sl1, k6, slip marker, knit to last st, p1.
        Row 5: Sl1, k to last 2 sts before marker, k2tog, slip marker, k2, kfb, k3, p1.
        Row 6: Sl1, k7, slip marker, knit to last st, p1.
        Row 7: Sl1, k to last 2 stitches before marker, k2tog, slip marker, k2, kfb, k4, p1.
        Row 8: Bind off 4 sts, knit to last st, p1.
        Repeat Rows 1 – 8 until 8 sts remain.

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